The Importance Of Party Loyalty

Sometime in the next week or so, I intend to do a blog post on Party loyalty as a virtue in an of itself. To be more specific, the idea that you should be loyal to your party not only when it is in the right, but more importantly when it is in the wrong.

Prior to me doing so, I’d be interested in getting some thoughts/feedback on the idea from people. Please leave a comment/flick me an email with your thoughts on the matter.

Thanks!

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13 Responses to “The Importance Of Party Loyalty”

  1. Possum Comitatus Says:

    Party loyalty is what you’re left with when you don’t have the balls to stand up for what you actually believe in.

  2. Doug Foncree Says:

    When the “Party” is in the wrong only an immoral individual can agree. The question can never be, “What does the Party say to do?” but must always be, “What is the right thing to do?” Loyalties of any kind are misplaced when siding with the wrong.

  3. B. P. M. Says:

    I agree with both the two previous comments, and would suggest that party loyalty is not a virtue particularly when the party is consistently wrong and the disagreements are long-standing – i.e. when your beliefs and the party’s diverge for lengthy periods of time. You know my thoughts on this matter, I’ve written you a lot of emails about it plus comments at other blogs 😉

  4. Doug Foncree Says:

    B.P.M.,
    Please don’t consider me to be a smart a@s, but wouldn’t it be proper to leave a party when you are consistantly at odds with policy or practice?
    Just curious.

  5. B. P. M. Says:

    Doug, that’s my point. I’m making a pointed jab at Tim and others (in good humour though) who are trying to convince me to stay because party loyalty is a good thing in itself. 😛

  6. Anoon Says:

    Loyalty is a virtue and an important one at that, it just depends where your loyalty is.

  7. Tim Andrews Says:

    BPM – I never used the loyalty argument as to why you should stay a member of the party, I used much more pragmatic arguments for that.
    The ‘loyalty as a virtue’ theme is a separate issue entirely.

  8. Doug Foncree Says:

    O.K., let’s get down to where the rubber meets the road. I am 71 years old and have worked most of my life either for a company or for myself. I have not intentionally done anything that I knew was wrong or immoral but I have quit working for companies who would have made me compromise my values if I continued in their employ. It seems to me to be more a question of priority than loyalty. I judge people (rightly or wrongly) by where their priorities lie. I am a member of no “party” for the simple fact that all parties are eventually in the wrong and I would therefore have to remove myself from my affiliation with them. As a free man in an enslaved society my choices are relatively clear. The common law applies for me and always will – do not be the cause of any harm or loss. Your path, B.P.M., from what little bit I know of you through your comments, seems to be clear. Remove yourself from any affiliation which would cause you to compromise your values.
    Doug

  9. Ben (Australia) Says:

    I’m an individual first, a voter second.

    “Party loyalty” can lead to some very dangerous consequences – so I’d suggest people read Cults in Our Midst by the late clinical psychologist Margaret Thaler Singer.

    In my short life, I’ve read about and witnessed some very damaging fruits associated with group loyalty (aka groupthink). They include but aren’t limited to:

    “Demand for Purity – The world is viewed as black and white and the members are constantly exhorted to conform to the ideology of the group and strive for perfection.”

    And:

    “Doctrine over person – The member’s personal experiences are subordinated to the sacred science and any contrary experiences must be denied or reinterpreted to fit the ideology of the group.”

    Lifton (at his peak) wrote about these fruits decades ago. But the larger point here is that when people talk about problems within their party, they aren’t causing them, they’re simply exposing them.

    And another question: Who defines “loyalty”?

  10. chris Says:

    Most criminal organisations succeed because they use prospects to do their dirty work. By the time they are permitted to join the gang, their hands are bloodied and their everlasting silence is assured. Political parties function in exactly the same way by using young hopefuls to prove their loyalty by organising branch stacks, illegal fund raising and all the other political scams in vogue these days such as dressing up as opposition parties on polling day to distribute fraudulent materials (ie Put Your Family First). Once the party power brokers have enough over the prospective party ticket holder (of dirt and obligation) to ensure silence over current

  11. chris Says:

    Most criminal organisations succeed because they use prospects to do their dirty work. By the time they are permitted to join the gang, their hands are bloodied and their everlasting silence is assured.
    Political parties function in exactly the same way by using young hopefuls to prove their loyalty by organising branch stacks, illegal fund raising and all the other political scams in vogue these days such as dressing up as opposition parties on polling day to distribute fraudulent materials (ie Put Your Family First).
    Once the party power brokers have enough over the prospective party ticket holder (dirt and obligation) to ensure silence (over current and future burial plot locations) and loyalty to their puppet masters for life, then they will have a crack at getting on the party ticket.
    You did not specify whether you mean being in the wrong in a moral or logical sense but it does not really matter because only puppets are able to progress to

  12. chris Says:

    Most criminal organisations succeed because they use prospects to do their dirty work. By the time they are permitted to join the gang, their hands are bloodied and their everlasting silence is assured.
    Political parties function in exactly the same way by using young hopefuls to prove their loyalty by organising branch stacks, illegal fund raising and all the other political scams in vogue these days such as dressing up as opposition parties on polling day to distribute fraudulent materials (ie Put Your Family First).
    Once the party power brokers have enough over the prospective party ticket holder (dirt and obligation) to ensure silence (over current and future burial plot locations) and loyalty to their puppet masters for life, then they will have a crack at getting on the party ticket.
    You did not specify whether you meant being in the wrong in an ethical or logical sense. To help you and fellow party apparatchiks feel better about yourselves you want to want to try and convince us that there is some virtue in selling your soul in the hope of gaining more power and financial security?

  13. chris Says:

    oh FFS, this stupid trackpad on my new laptop caused the triple post.

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