Monday Morning Music & Russian Poetry

Listening with considerable enjoyment to Music Of The Night, which was posted on Tim Humphreys’s Blog Mothypress, I’ve decided that I should occasionally post some music to bring some culture into your lives.

So, to brighten up the dreariness of this Monday Morning, here is the overture from Russlan & Ludmilla by Glinka (one of Russia’s most under-appreciated composers)

If anyone is interested, some Russian poetry is after the fold. Also, I should note that the idea of Monday Music is completely plagiarized from Jonathon Blanks. But my alliteration is different. I replace mood with morning. So it’s quite ok.

РУСЛАН И ЛЮДМИЛА

У лукоморья дуб зеленый,
Златая цепь на дубе том:
И днем и ночью кот ученый
Всё ходит по цепи кругом;
Идет направо – песнь заводит,
Налево – сказку говорит.

Там чудеса: там леший бродит,
Русалка на ветвях сидит;
Там на неведомых дорожках
Следы невиданных зверей;
Избушка там на курьих ножках
Стоит без окон, без дверей;
Там лес и дол видений полны;
Там о заре прихлынут волны
На брег песчаный и пустой,
И тридцать витязей прекрасных;
Чредой из вод выходят ясных,
И с ними дядька их морской;
Там королевич мимоходом
Пленяет грозного царя;Tам в облаках перед народом
Через леса, через моря
Колдун несет богатыря;
В темнице там царевна тужит,
А бурый волк ей верно служит;
Там ступа с Бабою Ягой
Идет, бредет сама собой;
Там царь Кащей над златом чахнет;
Там русской дух… там Русью пахнет!

И там я был, и мед я пил;
У моря видел дуб зеленый;
Под ним сидел, и кот ученый
Свои мне сказки говорил.
Одну я помню: сказку эту
Поведаю теперь я свету…

Some similarities to Coleridge’s Kubla Kahn don’t you think? In anycase, the non-Russian of you can read the English here. It’s not as good.

Advertisements

One Response to “Monday Morning Music & Russian Poetry”

  1. Tim Humphries Says:

    Excellent! I well remember studying Kubla in my senior year. Such creativity. I often wondered how the artist/composer could have put up with the centralized control of the Communist period.

    Now we know, they used music and poetry to get them through, or alternatively emigrated to the USA 🙂

    Keep the cultural references coming. Perhaps Jazz next week. 🙂

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: